Dynamically Changing A Chart Axis In Power BI Using Bookmarks And Buttons

A very common requirement when building Power BI reports is to allow the end user to change what is displayed on a chart axis dynamically. A lot of people have blogged about how to do this – Kasper’s blog post here is a great example – but the problem is that all of these solutions involve a lot of work remodelling your data and writing DAX code. However, the good news is that now we have Bookmarks and Buttons in Power BI there’s a new, easy, code-free way of achieving the same result, at least for some chart types. In this post I’ll show you how using the same data that Kasper used in his post.

Say you have the following dataset (using data from the Adventure Works DW sample database) in Power BI Desktop:

image

…and you need to display a column chart that shows the sum of SalesAmount broken down by either Country, Region or Currency.

The first step is to create a column chart and to drag Country, Region and Currency into the Axis well:

image

At this point the column chart will show Country and you’ll have the option to drill down – but don’t drill down yet. Add a Bookmark at this point and call it Country. Do not turn on drill down mode, but click on the “Go to the next level in the hierarchy” button:

image

When you do this, Country will be completely replaced by Region:

image

Add another Bookmark called Region, then click “Go to the next level in the hierarchy” again to show Currency:

image

Add a third and final Bookmark and call this one Currency. At this point you should have three Bookmarks for the three drill states:

image

The last thing to do is to add three buttons to the report linked to the three Bookmarks:

image

In this case I’ve used the “blank” button type, turned on the Outline, added button text that matches the name of the Bookmark, and set the Action Type property to “Bookmark” and then selected the appropriate Bookmark in the Bookmark property. Here’s how my Country button is configured:

image

image

image

image

And that’s it. After the report is published (notice that I’ve also used the new ability to turn off the visual header which makes everything look much tidier) you’ll be able to click the three buttons and switch between viewing Country, Region and Currency like so:

PQSwitchAxis

Of course this only approach works with visuals like the column chart that support drilldown so you can’t use it in all cases, but it does show off how powerful and useful the Button/Bookmark combination is. Ideally the Selection Pane would be able to control the visibility not just of entire visualisations but also of the fields and measures used within a visualisation, which would enable even more scenarios like this.

You can download the sample .pbix file for this post here.

Removing Punctuation From Text With The Text.Select M Function In Power BI/Power Query/Excel Get&Transform

A new, as-yet undocumented, M function appeared in the December 2017 release of Power BI Desktop (I assume it will appear in Excel soon): Text.Select. Here’s the documentation from the Query Editor:

 TextSelect

It’s very easy to use: the first parameter takes a text value, the second parameter takes either a text value containing a single text value or a list of single characters, and it returns the text from the first parameter minus all characters that are not in the second parameter. For example, the expression:

Text.Select("Hello", "l")

…returns the text value “ll”:

image

…and the expression:

Text.Select("Hello", {"H","e","o"})

…returns the text value “Heo”:

image

There are a lot of scenarios where Text.Select will be useful, and the one that I immediately thought of was to remove punctuation from text. In one of my earliest M posts on this blog I used Text.Remove to do this while trying to find Shakespeare’s favourite words, but the problem with this approach is that you have to explicitly specify all the characters you want to remove from your text – and there could be a lot of characters that need to be excluded. Text.Select is a much better option here because it allows you to specify the characters you want to keep.

The first step to doing this is to understand how to construct the list of the characters you do want to keep. You can do this very easily in M when declaring a list using the range technique I blogged about here, so you should read that post before carrying on. The following expression returns a list containing all 26 uppercase and lowercase letters in the alphabet plus a space:

List.Combine({{"A".."Z"},{"a".."z"},{" "}})

image

Of course depending on the scenario or language you’re working with you may want to include other characters, for example apostrophes or letters with accents, too. Here’s a slightly more complex example of how this list can be used with Text.Select:

let
    SourceText = "Hi! Stop, please. What is your name?",
    CharsToInclude = List.Combine({{"A".."Z"},{"a".."z"},{" "}}),
    RemovePunc = Text.Select(SourceText, CharsToInclude)
in
    RemovePunc

The query above takes the text “Hi! Stop, please. What is your name?” and returns the text “Hi Stop please What is your name”.

image

Finally, because I couldn’t read my old M code without cringing a little bit, here’s an updated version of my query that gets the top 100 words from the Complete Works Of Shakespeare (direct from the Project Gutenberg website):

let
  URL = "http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/100/pg100.txt",
  Source = Text.FromBinary(Web.Contents(URL)),
  Lowercase = Text.Lower(Source),
  RemovePunctuation = Text.Select(Lowercase, 
	List.Combine({{"a".."z"},{" "}})),
  SplitText = Splitter.SplitTextByWhitespace(QuoteStyle.None),
  SplitIntoWords = SplitText(RemovePunctuation),
  RemoveBlanks = List.Select(SplitIntoWords, each _<>" "),
  TableFromList = Table.FromColumns({RemoveBlanks},
	type table [Word=text]),
  FindWordCounts = Table.Group(
	TableFromList, 
		{"Word"}, 
		{{"Count", each Table.RowCount(_), type number}}),
  SortedRows = Table.Sort(
	FindWordCounts,
	{{"Count", Order.Descending}}),
  KeptFirstRows = Table.FirstN(SortedRows,100)
in 
  KeptFirstRows

Here they are as a word cloud (yes I know it’s not good dataviz practice, but it’s for fun):

image

You can download the .pbix file with this example in here.

BONUS FACT: another new M function appeared recently too: Function.From. You can read all about it on this thread on the Power Query forum.

The Power Query Branding Problem

A few years ago I started blogging about Power Query. Back then life was simple: I put “Power Query” in the title of a post and everyone knew what I was writing about, because Power Query was an Excel add-in you could download and install. Now, however, the technology has been renamed “Get & Transform” in Excel 2016 and is a native feature of Excel; the name “Power Query” only applies to the add-in for Excel 2010 and 2013. What’s more, the same technology is used in Power BI’s Query Editor and it’s also now in Azure Analysis Services, Analysis Services 2017 Tabular and the Common Data Service. This is obviously a good thing – I think Power Query is one of the best things to come out of Microsoft in the last decade – but it also presents me with a problem. How can I write about this technology if it doesn’t have a single, official, easily identifiable name?

In more recent times I’ve written posts with unwieldy names like “Introduction to Insert Topic Name Here in Power Query/Power BI/Excel 2016 Get & Transform” and in the future I suppose this will have to grow to “Introduction to Insert Topic Name Here in Power Query/Power BI/Excel 2016 Get & Transform/Analysis Services Data Loading/Common Data Service”. Tagging and categorising blog posts can help here, I know, but it’s the title of a blog post that’s the main determining factor as to whether it gets read or not when someone is looking at a list of search results. It’s getting ridiculous, but how else can I ensure that someone searching for the solution to a data loading problem in Excel 2016 Get & Transform will find a post I’ve written that contains the answer but shown in Power BI?

Inside Microsoft I understand that the team that builds this technology is known as the Power Query team. I certainly think about this technology as being called Power Query, as do a lot of other people in the community. However, my argument is that I can’t just use the name “Power Query” when I’m writing or speaking about this technology because most of its users – especially those who are new to it and who need the most help – don’t think of it as “Power Query”. They think of it as Excel 2016 Get & Transform, the Query Editor in Power BI Desktop and so on, the specific instances of it.

Maybe I’m making too big a deal of this, but in my opinion this is a problem not just for me but for Microsoft too. We all know how much developers rely on internet searches to find solutions to problems, and not having a single name for this technology makes it much harder to search successfully. This in turn makes it less likely that when a developer runs into a problem they will be able to solve it, which in turn means they are less likely to want to use this technology in future.

What’s the answer? It has to be to make the “Power Query” brand visible somewhere in the UI of all the products that use Power Query technology. I know there’s a risk of confusing users instead of helping them here (am I using Power Query or Power BI?), but it could be as simple as making a few small changes like renaming the “Query Editor” window to be the “Power Query Editor”:

image

I think that would be enough to let people know that “Power Query” is a technology in its own right and that content referring to “Power Query” is relevant to Excel, Power BI, SSAS and everywhere else that Power Query is used. It would also be nice if, now that M is the official name of the M language (and not Power Query Formula Language), the Advanced Editor window and the Custom Column dialog let users know that the code they were writing in them was in a language called M and not some mysterious, nameless scripting language.

What do you think? I’m interested to hear your comments and opinions…

UPDATE: victory is ours! See this comment from Faisal Mohamood of the Power Query team below
Hey there Chris – what you are saying makes complete sense. Power Query is the name of this capability and we will highlight the name of this capability as such in experiences where you are working with Power Query (and M).

The Diagnostics.ActivityId() M Function

I’ve blogged a few times about the tracing functionality that is built into Power Query/Get&Transform and Power BI (see here and here). The trace files themselves clearly contain a lot of interesting information, but there’s no official documentation about what they contain and the format seems to have changed several times. I guess they are meant for Microsoft internal use but that doesn’t stop us from taking a peek at their contents…

Whenever I’ve looked at the contents of a trace file, one problem I have faced is working out which events relate to the query that I’ve just executed. Today, though, I discovered an M function that can help with this: Diagnostics.ActivityId(). It’s not listed in the online M function reference but here’s the documentation from the function itself:

image

Calling the function does indeed return “an opaque identifier for the currently-running evaluation”. Using the following code in a query:

Diagnostics.ActivityId()

…returns the following:

image

Every time the query is refreshed a different value is returned.

Now, consider the following query that runs a query against a SQL Server database:

let
    Source = Sql.Database("localhost", "Adventure Works DW"),
    Test = Value.NativeQuery(
            Source, 
            "SELECT DISTINCT CalendarYear FROM DimDate")
in
    Test

image

How can you find the trace events that relate to a particular execution of this query? One way is to add a custom column to this query that returns the value returned by Diagnostics.ActivityId():

image

let
    Source = Sql.Database("localhost", "Adventure Works DW"),
    Test = Value.NativeQuery(
            Source, 
            "SELECT DISTINCT CalendarYear FROM DimDate"),
    #"Added Custom" = Table.AddColumn(
	Test, 
	"ActivityId", 
	each Diagnostics.ActivityId())
in
    #"Added Custom"

Then, after the query has been loaded into the Data Set you can copy the ActivityID from the table in the Data pane:

image

…and then search for the same value in the trace files:

image

Of course you’re now on your own trying to make sense of what you find in the trace file, but I hope this helps a little bit!

New M Functionality And Behaviour In Power BI Custom Data Connectors

Over the past few weeks I’ve spent some time playing around with Power BI custom data connectors and while I don’t have anything to share publicly yet (other people are way ahead of me in this respect – see the work of Igor Cotruta, Miguel Escobar and Kasper de Jonge among others) I have learned some interesting things that are worth blogging about.

First of all, the data privacy rules around combining data from different data sources do not apply in custom data connector code. As the docs say here:

Data combination checks do not occur when accessing multiple data sources from within an extension. Since all data source calls made from within the extension inherit the same authorization context, it is assumed they are “safe” to combine. Your extension will always be treated as a single data source when it comes to data combination rules. Users would still receive the regular privacy prompts when combining your source with other M sources.

Those of you who have followed my recent series on this topic, or who have struggled with the Formula.Firewall error, will appreciate how much easier this makes combining data from different sources.

Secondly, you have a lot more flexibility when it comes to different types of authentication for web services. As I showed in my session on web services and M at the Data Insights Summit, there are a lot of limitations when it comes to working with web services in Power BI or Excel. Within a custom data connector, however, you can connect to web services that use OAuth for authentication, you can make POST requests to web services that require authentication and you can pass a web API key from the credentials store through an HTTP custom header and not just through a query parameter – none of which are possible in Power BI or Excel.

I’m sure there are a lot of other useful bits of functionality or behaviour that are only available in custom data connectors – I know I’ve only just begun to learn what’s possible. Even with what I’ve listed here, though, I get the feeling that there will be a lot of cases where you will have no choice but to build a custom data connector just to be able to access certain data sources, even if you only need to create a single report. There may also be cases where it’s preferable to build a custom data connector rather than embed lots of complex M code in a Power BI report or Excel workbook, perhaps to make code portability easier. It’s a bit of a pain to have to have Visual Studio and the SDK installed in order to do this, but building a custom data connector is fairly easy if you already know M and the development experience in Visual Studio (with intellisense!) is much better than in the Advanced Query Editor window.

Data Privacy Settings In Power BI/Power Query, Part 3: The Formula.Firewall Error

In the first two parts of this series (see here and here) I showed how Power BI/Power Query/Excel Get & Transform’s data privacy settings can influence whether query folding takes place or even whether a query is able to run or not. In this post I’m going to talk about the situations where, whatever data privacy level you use, the query will not run at all and you get the infamous Formula.Firewall error.

I’ll admit I don’t understand this particular topic perfectly (I’m not sure anyone outside the Power Query dev team does) so what I will do is explain what I do know, demonstrate a few scenarios where the error occurs and show how to work around it.

Assume you have the two data sources described in my previous posts: an Excel workbook that contains just a single day name, and the DimDate table in SQL Server that can be filtered by the day name from Excel. Let’s also assume that both data sources have their data privacy levels set to Public. The following query, called FilterDay, loads the data from Excel and returns a text value containing the day name:

let
    Source = 
	Excel.Workbook(
		File.Contents("C:\FilterParameter.xlsx"), 
	null, true),
    FilterDay_Table = 
	Source{[Item="FilterDay",Kind="Table"]}[Data],
    ChangedType = 
	Table.TransformColumnTypes(
		FilterDay_Table,
		{{"Parameter", type text}}
	),
    Output = 
	ChangedType{0}[#"Parameter"]
in
    Output

image

Now, look at the following query:

let
    Source = 
	Sql.Database(
		"localhost", 
		"adventure works dw",
		[Query="select DateKey, EnglishDayNameOfWeek 
		from DimDate"]),
    FilteredRows = 
	Table.SelectRows(Source, 
		each ([EnglishDayNameOfWeek] = FilterDay)
	)
in
    FilteredRows

It filters the contents of the DimDate table and only returns the rows where the EnglishDayNameOfWeek column matches the day name returned by the FilterDay query. Notice that there are two steps in the query, Source (which runs a SQL query) and FilteredRows (which does the filtering). Here’s the output:

image

As you can see from the screenshot, the query runs. In fact it runs whatever data privacy settings you have set on both the data sources, although it’s worth pointing out that if you use your own SQL in an M query (as I do in this case) this stops query folding in all subsequent steps, as described here.

Now take a look at the following version of the query:

let
    Source = 
	Table.SelectRows(
		Sql.Database(
			"localhost", 
			"adventure works dw",
			[Query="select DateKey, 
				EnglishDayNameOfWeek 
				from DimDate"]
		), 
		each ([EnglishDayNameOfWeek] = FilterDay)
	)
in
    Source

The important difference here is that there is now one step in this query instead of two: the query and the filtering take place in the same step. Even more importantly, regardless of the data privacy settings, the query fails with the error:

Formula.Firewall: Query ‘DimDate With Native Query Single Step Fails’ (step ‘Source’) references other queries or steps, so it may not directly access a data source. Please rebuild this data combination.

image

The problem here is that the Power Query engine is not allowed to access two different data sources originating from different queries in the same step – as far as I understand it this is because it makes it too hard for the engine to work out whether a step connects to a data source or not, and so which data privacy rules should be applied.

At this point you might think that it’s straightforward to break your logic up into separate steps, as in the first example above. However there are some situations where it’s not so easy to work around the problem. For example, consider the following query:

let
    Source = 
	Sql.Database(
		"localhost", 
		"adventure works dw",
		[Query="
		 select DateKey, EnglishDayNameOfWeek 
		 from DimDate 
		 where 
		 EnglishDayNameOfWeek='" & FilterDay & "'" 
		]
	)
in
    Source

In this example I’m dynamically generating the SQL query that is being run and passing the name of the day to filter by into the WHERE clause. In the two previous examples the query that was run had no WHERE clause and the filtering on day name took place inside Power BI – in this case the filtering is happening inside the query, so in order to generate the WHERE clause I have to refer to the value that the FilterDay query returns in the same step. Therefore, this query also gives the same Formula.Firewall error seen above.

How can you work around this? Well, the following version of the query that attempts to reference FilterDay in a separate step doesn’t work either:

let
    DayAsStep = FilterDay,
    Source = 
	Sql.Database(
		"localhost", 
		"adventure works dw",
		[Query="
		 select DateKey, EnglishDayNameOfWeek 
		 from DimDate 
		 where 
		 EnglishDayNameOfWeek='" & DayAsStep & "'" 
		]
	)
in
    Source

 

Luckily, it turns out that if you use the Value.NativeQuery() function to run your query instead you can avoid the error. As I showed here, you can use this function to pass parameters to SQL queries. If you generate the record containing the parameters for the query as a separate step (called ParamRecord here), like so:

let
    Source = Sql.Database("localhost", "adventure works dw"),
    ParamRecord = [FilterParameter=FilterDay],
    Query = Value.NativeQuery(
                Source, 
                "select DateKey, EnglishDayNameOfWeek 
		from DimDate 
		where 
		EnglishDayNameOfWeek=@FilterParameter",
                ParamRecord)
in
    Query

Then the query runs successfully.

There is another way to avoid the error. In all the examples above I have two queries: one to get data from Excel, one to get filtered data from SQL Server. If these two queries are combined into a single query, it doesn’t matter if data from different data sources is accessed in the same step. So, for example, unlike all of the queries above the following query does not reference any other queries; instead it gets the day name from the Excel workbook in the ExcelSource step and then runs the dynamic SQL query in the SQLSource step, and runs successfully:

let
    ExcelSource = 
	Excel.Workbook(
		File.Contents("C:\FilterParameter.xlsx")
	, null, true),
    FilterDay_Table = 
	ExcelSource{[Item="FilterDay",Kind="Table"]}[Data],
    ChangedType = 
	Table.TransformColumnTypes(FilterDay_Table,
		{{"Parameter", type text}}),
    FilterDayStep = 
	ChangedType{0}[#"Parameter"],
    SQLSource = Sql.Database(
	"localhost", 
	"adventure works dw",
	[Query="
		select DateKey, EnglishDayNameOfWeek 
		from DimDate 
		where 
		EnglishDayNameOfWeek='" 
		& FilterDayStep & 
		"'" ])
in
    SQLSource

Clearly the M engine doesn’t get confused about accessing data from different sources in the same step if those data sources are created in the same query.

Of course you can avoid the Formula.Firewall error and make query folding happen as often as possible by turning off data privacy checks completely in the Options dialog. This will be the subject of the next post in this series.

Pre-Conference Training Day On Data Loading With Power BI/Excel Get & Transform/Power Query At PASS Summit

I’m pleased to announce that I’m running a pre-conference training day on “Loading and transforming data with Power BI and Power Query” at this year’s PASS Summit in Seattle. For the full agenda and details on how to register, see:
http://www.pass.org/summit/2017/Sessions/Details.aspx?sid=66485

This full-day session will teach you everything you need to know about loading data into Power BI or Excel; it’s specifically focussed on self-service BI scenarios, but if you want to learn M for SSAS 2017 you might find some of what I cover useful too. Topics covered include using the UI to build queries; using parameters and functions; the M language; data privacy settings; and creating custom data connectors. I hope to see you there!