Matching DAX Queries To Individual Visuals In A Published Power BI Report

The integration between Azure Log Analytics and Power BI opens up a lot of new possibilities for Power BI administrators. It’s still in preview (there’s a lot more cool stuff still to come) but the Analysis Services events that are available at the time of writing are still very useful: they give you pretty much everything you had in Profiler plus some new stuff too. In this post I’ll show you how you can use this data to work out which visual in a published report generated a particular DAX query.

In Log Analytics you can get information about all the queries run against a dataset using a simple KQL query like this one (I haven’t included an explicit time filter in this query, although you would want to do this in real life):

PowerBIDatasetsWorkspace | 
where ArtifactName == "InsertWorkspaceNameHere" 
and OperationName == 'QueryEnd' 

The QueryEnd event is raised every time a query finishes running – it’s an event you may already be familiar with from Profiler, xEvents or the Log Analytics integration with AAS – and it tells you useful things like the time the query finished, the duration, the text of the DAX query, the user running the query and so on. However what is new for Power BI is the contents ApplicationContext column. My colleague Kasper blogged about how you can use this column to get the DatasetId and ReportId when using AAS here; it now also contains a GUID that identifies the exact visual on a report that generated the DAX query.

Taking a closer look at this column shows that it contains a JSON document:

Here’s a more sophisticated KQL query that parses that JSON document, extracts the contents into separate columns and returns other columns you might need for troubleshooting like the DAX query text and query duration:

PowerBIDatasetsWorkspace | 
where ArtifactName == "InsertWorkspaceNameHere" 
and OperationName == 'QueryEnd' |
extend a = todynamic(ApplicationContext)|
extend VisualId = a.Sources[0].VisualId, ReportId = a.Sources[0].ReportId, 
DatasetName = ArtifactName, DAXQuery = EventText |
project TimeGenerated, WorkspaceName, DatasetName, ReportId, VisualId, DurationMs, DAXQuery |
order by TimeGenerated desc 

The ID of the dataset isn’t that interesting because you can get it, and the name of the dataset, in other columns. The ReportId is useful because it tells you which report generated the query and there are a number of ways you can find out which report this relates to. For example, you can just open the report in the browser and look at the url: the Report ID is the GUID between “/reports/” and “/ReportSection” as detailed here.

How can you work out which visual the VisualId relates to though? It’s not obvious, but it is possible. First you have to open your report in Power BI Desktop, open Performance Analyzer, refresh the report page and export the data from Performance Analyzer as a JSON file as detailed here. The data you need is hidden in this JSON file in the Visual Container Lifecycle event; here’s the M code for a Power Query query to get it:

let
  Source = Json.Document(
    File.Contents(
      "C:\InsertFileNameHere.json"
    )
  ), 
  events = Source[events], 
  #"Converted to Table" = Table.FromList(
    events, 
    Splitter.SplitByNothing(), 
    null, 
    null, 
    ExtraValues.Error
  ), 
  #"Expanded Column1"
    = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(
    #"Converted to Table", 
    "Column1", 
    {
      "name", 
      "component", 
      "start", 
      "id", 
      "metrics", 
      "end", 
      "parentId"
    }, 
    {
      "name", 
      "component", 
      "start", 
      "id", 
      "metrics", 
      "end", 
      "parentId"
    }
  ), 
  #"Filtered Rows" = Table.SelectRows(
    #"Expanded Column1", 
    each (
      [name]
        = "Visual Container Lifecycle"
    )
  ), 
  #"Expanded metrics"
    = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(
    #"Filtered Rows", 
    "metrics", 
    {
      "status", 
      "visualTitle", 
      "visualId", 
      "visualType", 
      "initialLoad"
    }, 
    {
      "status", 
      "visualTitle", 
      "visualId", 
      "visualType", 
      "initialLoad"
    }
  ), 
  #"Removed Other Columns"
    = Table.SelectColumns(
    #"Expanded metrics", 
    {
      "visualTitle", 
      "visualId", 
      "visualType"
    }
  )
in
  #"Removed Other Columns"

Here’s an example of the output of this Power Query query:

This shows that, on the report in question, there were three visuals: a card visual called “My Card”, a column chart called “My Column Chart” and a table called “My Table”. It also shows the IDs of these visuals which you can match up with the VisualId values in the ApplicationContext column in Log Analytics.

The last problem is matching these names up with the actual visuals in the report and this will only be easy if the report designer has followed the best practice of giving each visual a meaningful name; you can now do this by double-clicking on the visual in the Selection pane or by editing the Title Text property as Reid Havens shows here.

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