The List.* M Functions And The equationCriteria Argument

Last week a reader left a comment on my blog asking what the third argument of the List.Contains() M function (somewhat cryptically called equationCriteria) does. I didn’t know, so I did some research and found out that lots of the List.* functions have the same argument. The documentation for List.Distinct() has a few examples but no real explanation of how they work. It also says:

For more information about equationCriteria, see Parameter Values.

…but there’s no link or indication where the documentation on ‘Parameter Values’ can be found. A bit more digging led me to the bottom of this page:

Equation criteria

Equation criteria for list values can be specified as either a

  • A function value that is either

    • A key selector that determines the value in the list to apply the equality criteria, or

    • A comparer function that is used to specify the kind of comparison to apply. Built in comparer functions can be specified, see section for Comparer functions.

  • A list value which has

    • Exactly two items

    • The first element is the key selector as specified above

    • The second element is a comparer as specified above.

Still not exactly helpful, is it? After a bit of time testing, though, I think I’ve worked out how what’s possible with the equationCriteria argument and this blog post will, I hope, help any future M coders who are struggling with the same question. Let’s see some examples…

The basics

First of all, the basics. The following expression using List.Contains() returns TRUE because the text value “apples” appears in the list {“apples”, “oranges”, “pears”}:

List.Contains({"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, "apples")

image

The following returns FALSE because the text value “grapes” does not appear in the list {“apples”, “oranges”, “pears”}:

List.Contains({"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, "grapes")

image

However there are lots of different ways that text values can be compared and the equationCriteria argument allows you to specify which rules to follow.

Case sensitivity and culture

If you’ve written any M code you’ll know that it is case sensitive. As a result, the following returns FALSE:

List.Contains({"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, "Apples")

What happens if you want to do a case-insensitive comparison though? This is where the Comparer functions come in. The Comparer.FromCulture() function returns a function that compares two values according to the rules of a given culture or locale and optionally ignore case, and can be used in the equationCriteria argument. The following example returns TRUE:

List.Contains(
	{"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, 
	"Apples", 
	Comparer.FromCulture("en-GB", true)
)

In this case Comparer.FromCulture("en-GB", true) returns a function that compares two values for the English – Great Britain culture (for a full list of culture values, see the Language Tag column of the table on this page); the second, optional argument here makes the function ignore case when making the comparison. The function that Comparer.FromCulture() returns is then used by List.Contains() to make the comparison.

Rather than specify a culture you can also use the Culture.Current function to return the current system culture. For me, Culture.Current returns the value “en-GB” because I live in Great Britain and have my PC configured to use a British English locale:

image

The following example shows how Culture.Current can be used with Comparer.FromCulture and also returns TRUE, at least for me:

List.Contains(
	{"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, 
	"Apples", 
	Comparer.FromCulture(
		Culture.Current, 
		true
	)
)

If you’re curious to see an example where different cultures produce different results here’s one I stole from this article on string comparisons and sorting in .NET. Apparently in English the character æ is treated the same as the combination of the two characters ae but this is not the case in Danish. As a result the following returns TRUE:

List.Contains(
	{"aepples", "oranges", "pears"}, 
	"æpples", 
	Comparer.FromCulture(
		"en-GB", 
		true
	)
)

Whereas this returns FALSE:

List.Contains(
	{"aepples", "oranges", "pears"}, 
	"æpples", 
	Comparer.FromCulture(
		"da-DK", 
		true
	)
)

Ordinal comparisons

If you don’t want all the uncertainty of cultures and case sensitivity you can just make an ordinal comparison, which will compare two strings by finding the unicode character value for each character in each string and compare those values. To do this you can use the Comparer.Ordinal() function. The following returns FALSE:

List.Contains(
	{"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, 
	"Apples", 
	Comparer.Ordinal
)

…because “a” is not the same unicode character as “A”, and so “apples” and “Apples” are not treated as equal.

Custom comparer functions

As the documentation hints you can also write your own function to do the comparison. A comparer function is just – as far as I can see – a function that has two arguments and returns a logical value. Here’s an example of a custom function that takes two text values, x and y, and returns true if the first three characters of x are the same as y:

(x as text, y as text)=>Text.Start(x,3)=y

It can be used with List.Contains() as in the following example, which returns TRUE:

List.Contains(
	{"apples", "oranges", "pears"}, 
	"app",
        (x as text, y as text)=>Text.Start(x,3)=y
)

What must be happening here is that the function is called three times, every value in the list {“apples”, “oranges”,”pears”} is being passed to the x argument and for each call “app” is passed to y; because the first three characters of “apples” are “app” the function returns true in this case, so List.Contains() returns true.

Key selectors

If you’re working with a list of records you might only want to do the comparison on one field in the record, and this is what key selectors allow you to do. The following example, which returns TRUE:

List.Contains(
	{[Fruit="apples", Colour="Red"], 
         [Fruit="oranges", Colour="Orange"],
         [Fruit="pears", Colour="Green"]}, 
	[Fruit="apples", Colour="Russet"],
        each [Fruit]  
)

…does so because it only compares the Fruit field in each record, and the Fruit fields in [Fruit=”apples”, Colour=”Red”] and [Fruit=”apples”, Colour=”Russet”] are indeed the same. However the following example returns FALSE:

List.Contains(
	{[Fruit="apples", Colour="Red"], 
         [Fruit="oranges", Colour="Orange"],
         [Fruit="pears", Colour="Green"]}, 
	[Fruit="apples", Colour="Russet"],
        each [Colour]  
)

…because the Colour “Russet” does not appear anywhere in the Colour field of any of the records in the first parameter.

Combining key selectors and comparison functions

Finally, as the documentation suggests, you can combine the above methods of comparison by passing a list containing two items to equationCriteria: the first item in the list must be a key selector, the second must be a comparer function. For example, the following returns TRUE:

List.Contains(
	{[Fruit="apples", Colour="Red"], 
         [Fruit="oranges", Colour="Orange"],
         [Fruit="pears", Colour="Green"]}, 
	[Fruit="Apples", Colour="Russet"],
        {each [Fruit], Comparer.FromCulture("en-GB", true)} 
)

…because it only looks at the Fruit field of each record, and it does a case-insensitive comparison using the en-GB culture, so “apples” and “Apples” are equal.

More Detail On Detail Rows Expressions In SSAS Tabular V.Next

My second-favourite feature in SSAS Tabular v.next after Power Query integration is the Detail Rows expression property for measures – it not only brings drillthrough on measures to Tabular, it means that we can define meaningful drillthrough on any measure, no matter how it is calculated. There’s a basic description of the functionality in this blog post but I thought it would be useful to walk through a simple example showing how it can be used.

Consider a simple SSAS Tabular model with two tables in it. First, a table containing sales data called Sales:

image

Second, a date table called Date:

image

[Note: dates are in DD/MM/YYYY format]

There are two measures with the following definitions:

Total Sales:=SUM(Sales[Sales])

Total YTD Sales:=TOTALYTD([Total Sales], 'Date'[Date])

The measure Total YTD Sales gives the running total of sales from the beginning of the current year. I know it doesn’t follow Marco and Alberto’s best-practice pattern but I wanted to keep things simple on the DAX front…

Browsing the model in an Excel PivotTable gives the following result:

image

At this point if you double-click on cell C6 in the PivotTable you get the following, not very useful result, on a new worksheet:

image

What drillthrough does in SSAS Multidimensional, and what the new Detail Rows Expression property in SSAS Tabular v.next does, is allow an end user to see the detail-level data (usually the rows in the fact table) that was aggregated to give the value the user clicked on in the original PivotTable.

For the Total Sales measure, this property can be set with a DAX expression that returns a table something like this:

SELECTCOLUMNS(
	'Sales', 
	"Date", 'Sales'[Date], 
	"Sales Value", [Total Sales]
)

[For more details on the SelectColumns() function, see here]

image

Now when you click on cell C6 in the PivotTable you get the result of the table expression above filtered by the context of the cell you’ve clicked on – in this case, the date 4/1/2017. What appears in the new worksheet is data from the row from the Sales table for 4/1/2017:

image

This is already better than SSAS Multidimensional drillthrough because as a developer you have control over the column headers displayed in this table (in Multidimensional drillthrough the column names come out in a ridiculously user-unfriendly format) and the order that they are displayed in (which is equally painful to control in Multidimensional).

Now, consider cell D6 in the PivotTable, the cell that shows the year-to-date sales amount for 4/1/2017. If a user double-clicked on this cell they would expect to see all of the rows from the Sales table from 1/1/2017 to 4/1/2017, the rows whose sales have been aggregate to give the YTD total.

This can be achieved using the following expression in the Detail Rows Expression for the Total YTD Sales measure:

CALCULATETABLE(
	SELECTCOLUMNS(
		'Sales', 
		"Date", 
		'Sales'[Date], 
		"Sales Value", 
		[Total Sales]
	), 
	DATESYTD('Date'[Date])
)

image

Now, double-clicking on cell D6 in the PivotTable gives the following table:

image

It may not look all that impressive, but there are few words that can describe how happy this makes me feel. This is exactly what is not possible with drillthrough in SSAS Multidimensional, and why drillthrough in Multidimensional has always been so frustrating to use. It’s great to see the feature properly implemented in Tabular.

Record.AddField(), Functions And The Delayed Option In M

Today I was looking at the Record.AddField() M function and saw it had a mysterious – and badly documented – optional fourth argument called delayed. Of course I had to work out what it did, and having done so I thought I’d blog about it in case someone found it useful (and however obscure the topic, there’s always someone out there who finds this stuff useful).

Imagine you have an M function called ReturnANumber that has no arguments at all and returns the number 999:

() as number => 999

image

Now imagine that you want to return this function in a record (which is exactly what #shared does). The following expression:

[MyFunction = ReturnANumber]

…returns a record with one field whose value is of type function:

image

But what if you wanted the field to contain the number that the function returns, not a reference to the function itself? The delayed option of Record.AddField() allows you to do this: if you set it to true, you get the value the function returns.

Record.AddField([], "MyFunction", ReturnANumber, true)

image

Setting delayed to false does the same as the first example above:

Record.AddField([], "MyFunction", ReturnANumber, false)

image

Another way to get the same result as setting delayed to true is to use Function.Invoke():

[MyFunction = Function.Invoke(ReturnANumber,{})]

image

Now I need to think of a real-world use for this…

Web.Contents(), Caching And The ExcludedFromCacheKey Option In Power BI And Power Query

When you’re using the Web.Contents() M function to call a web service from Power Query or Power BI, you don’t necessarily get one HTTP request each time you call the function: some caching takes place, so that if you make the same request multiple times your query won’t waste time asking for the same data over and over. In this post I’m going to share the results of some tests I made to show how caching works with Web.Contents() and what factors influence it.

For my tests I built a simple web service in Microsoft Flow, similar to the one I blogged about here, that accepts a HTTP POST request and calls a stored procedure in an Azure SQL Database. The stored procedure then updates a table in the database and this in turn allows me to count the number of times the web service is called. Finally, the web service returns the value 0 if the stored procedure has executed successfully.

This web service can then be called from either Power Query or Power BI using the Web.Contents() function, something like this (because the URL for the web service is very long I stored it in a parameter called WebServiceURL):

let
    Source = Web.Contents(
	WebServiceURL,
	[Content=Text.ToBinary("Hello")]
	),
    #"Imported JSON" = Json.Document(Source,1252)
in
    #"Imported JSON"

The output of the query when run in Power Query and loaded to an Excel table is this:

image

The first important thing to point out is that the above query, when refreshed in the latest versions of Power Query (I’m running Excel 2016 build 7571.2109) and Power BI (build 2.41.4581.361- November 2016 release), results in a single call to the web service. It might seem like I’m stating the obvious but in the past I’ve seen plenty of cases where a data source has been queried multiple times by Power Query/Power BI even if I was only expecting it to be queried once.

Now, let’s look at a query that calls this web service several times. Here’s the query above converted to a function called fnCallWebService:

() => 
let
    Source = Web.Contents(
	WebServiceURL,
	[Content=Text.ToBinary("Hello")]),
    #"Imported JSON" = Json.Document(Source,1252)
in
    #"Imported JSON"

Here’s a query that calls this function once for each row of the following table:

image

let
    Source = Excel.CurrentWorkbook(){[Name="MyTable"]}[Content],
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(
	Source,
	{{"Row", Int64.Type}}),
    #"Invoked Custom Function" = Table.AddColumn(
	#"Changed Type", 
	"fnCallWebService", 
	each fnCallWebService())
in
    #"Invoked Custom Function"

In the query above I used the Invoke Custom Function button to call the function for each row in the source table and put the value returned by the function in a new column. The output is this:

image

Even though the function is called four times, once for each row in the original table, that does not mean that the web service is called four times – it isn’t, it’s only called once. In this case Power BI/Power Query knows that each of the four calls to the function is making an identical request to the web service and so it only goes to the web service once, and thereafter uses a cached result the other three times.

One way to stop this caching from taking place is to add an HTTP header to the request to the web service and pass a different value to that header for each call. Here’s another version of my function, now called fnCallWebServiceWithHeaders, which this time takes a number as a parameter and then passes that number to the web service via a header called MyHeader:

(RowNum as number) => let
    Source = Web.Contents(
	WebServiceURL,
	[Content=Text.ToBinary("Hello"), 
	Headers=[MyHeader=Text.From(RowNum)]]),
    #"Imported JSON" = Json.Document(Source,1252)
in
    #"Imported JSON"

Now if I call this function for each row of the table, and for each call pass the value in the [Row] column through to the function like so:

image

let
    Source = Excel.CurrentWorkbook(){[Name="MyTable"]}[Content],
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(
	Source,
	{{"Row", Int64.Type}}),
    #"Invoked Custom Function" = Table.AddColumn(
	#"Changed Type", 
	"fnCallWebServiceWithHeaders", 
	each fnCallWebServiceWithHeaders([Row]))
in
    #"Invoked Custom Function"

…the web service gets hit four times. The presence of a different value for the MyHeader header in each request is enough to prevent any caching from taking place.

It is possible, however, to get Power BI/Power Query to ignore one or more headers when working out whether caching should take place using the ExcludedFromCacheKey option in Web.Contents(). Here’s one more version of my function, now called fnCallWebServiceWithHeadersExlCache, which uses this option:

(RowNum as number) => 
let
    Source = Web.Contents(
	WebServiceURL,
	[Content=Text.ToBinary("Hello"), 
	Headers=[MyHeader=Text.From(RowNum)], 
	ExcludedFromCacheKey={"MyHeader"}]),
    #"Imported JSON" = Json.Document(Source,1252)
in
    #"Imported JSON"

The ExcludedFromCacheKey option takes a list of text values which represent the names of headers that are to be ignored when considering which requests can be cached. In the example above my list contains just the one header, MyHeader, and when this is used in a query like so:

let
    Source = Excel.CurrentWorkbook(){[Name="MyTable"]}[Content],
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(
	Source,
	{{"Row", Int64.Type}}),
    #"Invoked Custom Function" = Table.AddColumn(
	#"Changed Type", 
	"fnCallWebServiceWithHeaders", 
	each fnCallWebServiceWithHeadersExlCache([Row]))
in
    #"Invoked Custom Function"

…even though the function is called four times, once for each row in the table, and even though each time Web.Contents() is called it is with a different value passed through to the MyHeader header, only one request is made to the web service and the three subsequent requests are answered from cache again.

In summary, if you’re calling a web service multiple times in a query and especially if you’re using the Headers option in Web.Contents(), this is important stuff to understand because caching can make a big difference to the performance of your queries.

12th Blog Birthday

Today is the 12th anniversary of the first post on this blog, and as in previous years I’m going to use this as an opportunity to sum up my thoughts over what’s been going on in my corner of the Microsoft BI world in the last twelve months.

Power BI

I think it’s fair to say that 2016 was the year that Power BI became the big commercial success that many of us hoped it would be. After the achingly slow uptake of Power Pivot and the failure of the original Office 365 Power BI it’s great to see Microsoft BI with a hit on its hands. Many of my existing customers have started using it alongside the rest of the SQL Server BI stack, especially SSAS, because it’s much easier to build reports and share them via the browser or mobile devices than with SSRS or Excel. I’ve also started working with new type of customer, one that I’ve never worked with before: small and medium organisations (including many not-for-profits) who have Office 365 but no existing BI solution, the kind of organisation that does not have the money or resources for a SQL Server BI solution or indeed any other kind of traditional BI solution. This, I believe, is where the real opportunity for Power BI lies and where the majority of the new growth will come from.

Apart from my own customers, there’s plenty of other evidence for the success of Power BI. The energy of the Power BI community, on forums and at user groups, is amazing – and once again, the people that I meet at user groups are completely different to the crowd you get at a normal SQL Server user group. The analysts love it too: for example, Microsoft is now in the Leaders section of the Gartner Magic Quadrant. There’s also the fact that competitors like Tableau have started attacking Power BI in their marketing, so I guess they must consider it a major threat.

Why has it been such a success? The underlying technology is great, but then again the technology was always great. The pace of change is incredible and it’s good to see Microsoft throwing its vast resources behind a product with some potential, rather than another Zune or Windows phone. There’s still some catching up to do but at this rate any existing gaps will have been closed by the end of 2017. The willingness to listen to customer feedback and act on it is refreshing. The Excel/Power Query/Power Pivot and SSAS crossover adds a angle that the competition doesn’t have. Finally, the licensing is almost perfect: it’s simple (compared to the usual thousands of SKUs that Microsoft usually comes up with) and cheap/free, although organisations with thousands of users who all need Pro subscriptions find the costs escalate rapidly; I’d like to see special deals for large numbers of users, and some recognition that many users who need to see Pro-level reports don’t need to create reports using these features. I know Microsoft has already heard this from a lot of people, though, and has taken it on board.

Probably the only criticism that I can make that Microsoft doesn’t seem to be actively addressing is the fact that the data visualisation functionality is relatively weak. If you know what you’re doing and you have the patience, you can create good-looking reports. For people like me who have minimal artistic talent and limited patience the experience of building reports can be frustrating. There are some features like small multiples that I can’t believe are still not implemented in the core product, and nothing to help users to follow good data visualisation practice. R visuals and custom visuals help fill the gap (I was quite impressed by this one by Business Solution Group, for example, which isn’t available in the gallery) but really Microsoft need to put some more thought into this area.

Analysis Services

There’s been a lot of good news in the world of Analysis Services this year too. SSAS Tabular 2016 dealt with a lot of the shortcomings that dogged it in 2012 and 2014: a much faster and less buggy development experience; many-to-many relationships supported using bi-directional cross filtering; and powerful new DAX functions and features like variables. SSAS Tabular v.next promises even more great new features such as the integration of the M language. These changes and the fact it’s now available in Standard Edition mean that Tabular should be the default choice over Multidimensional for almost all new SSAS projects.

Sadly, it looks like the neglect of Multidimensional will continue for the foreseeable future. I stopped being angry about this a long time ago and I understand that Microsoft need to concentrate their resources on SSAS Tabular and Power BI, but a lot of Multidimensional customers are now wondering where they stand. Either Microsoft needs to show some commitment to Multidimensional by adding new features – it wouldn’t take much to make a difference – or add features to Tabular that make it possible for more Multidimensional users to migrate over to it, for example equivalents to Scope statements or calculated members on non-Measures dimensions.

Last of all, Azure SSAS opens up a lot of exciting new possibilities for both on-prem SSAS users as well as Power BI users. Kasper does a great job of summing them up here and I won’t repeat what he has to say; once again I’m seeing a lot of interest from my customers and I’m sure I’ll be helping a few to migrate to the cloud very soon. The pricing seems a bit excessive at the moment, even when you take into account the ability to pause servers, and I hope it changes before RTM. Also it’s SSAS Tabular only at this stage but support for Multidimensional is by far the top-voted request on the feedback forum, with more than five times as many votes as the next highest request, so maybe this will be Microsoft’s opportunity to show some love to the Multidimensional world?

The Show Hidden Cubes SSAS Connection String Property

If you need to write queries in SQL Server Management Studio against an SSAS cube that has its Visible property set to false, you have a problem because when you connect to your database you can’t see the cube or its metadata! Luckily you can override this and make the cube visible by setting the following connection string property when you connect:

Show Hidden Cubes=true

image

Connection string properties can be set in the Additional Connection Parameters tab of the connection dialog that appears when you open a new MDX query window.

Unfortunately this doesn’t make any objects in the cube that are not visible, like measures or dimensions, visible again – it just makes the cube itself visible. However, if you’re working on the Calculations tab of the Cube Editor in SSDT it is possible to make all hidden objects visible as I show here.

First Thoughts On The Integration Of Power Query/M Into Analysis Services Tabular

Last Friday’s big news was the release of the first CTP for Analysis Services v.next. Among several major new pieces of functionality (Ragged hierarchies! Drillthrough that works properly, even for calculations! Table-level security!) probably the biggest is the integration of Power Query/M into Analysis Services. As you can probably guess, I’m incredibly pleased that my two favourite technologies have got together. The technical details are given in this blog post, which I suggest you read if you haven’t done so already, but what I think is missing is an explanation of why this is so important and what kind of opportunities it opens up – hence this post. Of course this is just my take on the subject and not what Microsoft may actually thinking; it’s also very early days, so as the functionality develops and I have more chance to think about this my opinions may change. If you have any ideas on this subject I would be interested to hear them so please leave a comment!

Why this had to happen: Power BI

There is an obvious reason why Microsoft decided to integrate Power Query/M into SSAS, and that is because it needs to support the conversion of Power BI models into Analysis Services Tabular models. There are two scenarios where this will be necessary.

The first is the ability to convert a Power BI model into an Azure Analysis Services Tabular model (listed as ‘planned’ here), something that will be a key selling point for Azure Analysis Services when it releases. The engine behind Power BI is essentially the same as the one used in Analysis Services so migrating the data model should be straightforward, but since Power BI uses Power Query/M to load data then a migrated Azure Analysis Services model will also have to use Power Query/M.

The second scenario is similar to the first. We now know that on-premises Power BI will be delivered through Reporting Services v.next, and it’s reasonable to assume Reporting Services will need a database engine to store the data for published Power BI reports. That engine will have to be an Analysis Services instance of some kind (either standalone or running in-process inside Reporting Services) and again for that to work Analysis Services will have to support the same data access mechanisms as Power BI.

Better support for a larger number of data sources

I’ve just argued why Microsoft was obliged to include this functionality in SSAS v.next but in fact there are many positive reasons for doing this too. The most obvious one is to do with support for more data sources. At the moment SSAS Tabular supports a pretty good range of data sources, but the world of BI is getting more and more diverse and in order to stay relevant SSAS needs to support far more than it does today. By using Power Query/M as its data access mechanism, SSAS v.next will immediately support a much larger number of data sources and this number is going to keep on growing: any investment that Microsoft or third parties make for Power BI in this area will also benefit SSAS. Also, because Power Query/M can query and fold to more than just relational databases, I suspect that in the future this will allow for DirectQuery connections to many of these non-relational data sources too.

Different data sources for partitions in the same table

Another benefit of this change is that we’ll have a lot more flexibility with partitioning tables in an SSAS Tabular model. As the blog post says:

As long as a partition’s M query adheres to the column mappings of the table, you are free to perform any transformations and pull in data from any data source defined in the model.

In SSAS 2016 the partitions in a table all have to get data from the same data source whereas in v.next we’ll be able to get data from different data sources in different partitions, and this opens up some interesting new possibilities. For example, I can imagine a simple budgeting application where the partitions in a table get data from different Excel workbooks stored in OneDrive for Business, and where the each partition gets processed automatically when changes are saved to one of these workbooks.

Does this replace SSIS and my data warehouse? 

The short answer is no. Power Query/M is not a full-featured ETL tool and I don’t think it ever will be; it certainly does not have the kind of functionality needed to perform enterprise-level ETL right now. My view is that Microsoft have built Power Query/M into SSAS for the reasons above and not to encourage enterprise SSAS users to do their own quick-and-dirty ETL when loading data (although there is a risk that that will happen anyway). That said, I think the dividing line between corporate and self-service BI will become increasingly blurred over the next few years as the Microsoft BI stack develops, and we’ll see Analysis Services being used in self-service scenarios as well as the more traditional corporate ones.

Centralised data source objects

One last thing to point out is that the way SSAS v.next makes a distinction between data sources and other queries is very interesting. In Power BI and Power Query it’s easy to end up with data source connection information duplicated across multiple queries unless you know what you’re doing, and this can cause no end of problems later on in a project. As far as I can see, in SSAS v.next a “data source object” is an M query that only contains the connection to external data, while all other queries have to reference a data source to be able to access external data. This means, as the blog post says:

Referring to data source objects helps to centralize data source settings for multiple queries and simplifies deployments and maintenance if data source definitions must be updated later on. When updating a data source definition, all M queries that refer to it automatically use the new settings.

I wonder whether this concept is coming to Power BI and Power Query at some point? I hope so – it makes a lot of sense.