SSASDiag: A Tool To Help Diagnose Analysis Services Problems

There are a lot of great community-developed tools out there for Analysis Services developers to use (BI Developer Extensions, DAX Studio, Tabular Editor, Analysis Services Query Analyzer to name a few) and they have saved me vast amounts of time and effort over the years. When I joined Microsoft last month I came across one which I had never seen before but which is nevertheless quite mature and feature-rich: the SSAS Diagnostics Tool or SSASDiag for short. It’s available on GitHub here:
https://github.com/ssasdiag/SSASDiag

…and you can read the documentation here:
https://github.com/ssasdiag/SSASDiag/wiki/SSAS-Diagnostics—Analysis

image

It’s an open source tool developed by the people who support Analysis Services here at Microsoft and is intended to help them collect and analyse the information they need to troubleshoot on-premises SSAS  issues, but it’s available for anyone to use. I haven’t had a chance to take a proper look at it yet myself, unfortunately, but I thought it would be interesting for any SSAS fans out there to check out.

[Thanks to Jon Burchel for providing all the background information for this post]

DAX Median() Function Does Not Work On Tables With More Than 2 Billion Rows

An interesting – if obscure – fact I learned recently is that a small number of DAX functions such as Median() do not work on tables with more than 2 billion rows in Analysis Services Tabular, Azure AS and Power BI.

It’s quite easy to reproduce in Power BI. The following M expression returns a table with two billion and four rows:

let
    Source = 
    List.Repeat(
        {1,2,3,4},
        500000001
        ),
    #"Converted to Table" = 
    Table.FromList(
        Source, 
        Splitter.SplitByNothing(), 
        null, 
        null, 
        ExtraValues.Error
        ),
    #"Changed Type" = 
    Table.TransformColumnTypes(
        #"Converted to Table",
        {{"Column1", Int64.Type}}
        )
in
    #"Changed Type"

It takes some time to load this table  – around twenty minutes – but because there are only four distinct values in the table the resulting .pbix file is only 31KB thanks to the way Power BI compresses data.

If you load this table into your dataset, call it VeryBigTable and create the following measure:

Median Test = MEDIAN(VeryBigTable[Column1])

…and use the measure in a visual, you’ll see the following error:

image

The current query cannot be evaluated for the ‘VeryBigTable (42)’ table, because the table contains more than two billion rows.

What’s more, the error will always occur even if you apply a filter to the table that returns less than two billion rows. The same problem occurs with some other functions, such as Percentile(), but it’s worth pointing out that the vast majority of DAX functions work as normal with tables with more than two billion rows – for example, in the pbix file used here the Sum() and CountRows() functions not only work fine but return instantly.

Luckily, in the case of the Median() function, there is an easy workaround because you can calculate a median in other ways such as the one described on the DAX Patterns site here. The code is a lot more verbose but it works on a 2 billion+ row table.

image

SQLBits Power BI And Analysis Services Videos Now Free To View Online

SQLBits is one of the best Microsoft data platform conferences around, and last week’s event in Manchester was particularly good. As usual, videos of almost all of the sessions are available for everyone to view for free online (no registration required) here:

https://sqlbits.com/content/Event18

There were lots of Power BI and Analysis Services related sessions, so I thought I’d call out a few:

  • If you’re interested in the new calculation groups feature in SSAS 2019 that I blogged about last week, you should definitely watch Christian Wade’s two-part session here and here (part two has all the juicy details in), which also gives some details about other upcoming features such as XMLA endpoints. Kasper’s session here covers a lot of the same topics.
  • There’s more insight into Microsoft’s Power BI roadmap and thinking in the Q&A session with Christian, Kasper and Adam here
  • Marco and Alberto always do great sessions, and Alberto’s session on Aggregations here and Marco’s session on many-to-many relationships here are up to their usual high standards.
  • My session on Power BI Dataflows here sums up my current thoughts about them.

Of course there’s lots more there (more than I have had a chance to watch) so let me know if there are other sessions that are good!

SSAS Tabular 2019, Calculation Groups And Migration From SSAS Multidimensional

With the release of CTP 2.3 of SQL Server 2019 today there was big news for Analysis Services Tabular developers: Calculation Groups. You can read all about them in detail in this blog post:

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/analysisservices/2019/03/01/whats-new-for-sql-server-2019-analysis-services-ctp-2-3/

In my opinion this is the most important new feature in DAX since… well, forever. It allows you to create a new type of calculation – which in most cases will be a time intelligence like a year-to-date or a previous period growth – that can be applied to multiple measures; basically the same thing that we have been doing in SSAS Multidimensional for years with the time utility/shell/date tool dimension technique. It’s certainly going to solve a lot of problems for a lot of SSAS Tabular implementations, many of which have hundreds or even thousands of measures for every combination of base measure and calculation type needed.

I’m not going to repeat any of the detailed technical information in the blog post here, though. Instead the point I want to make is that this is very big news for SSAS Multidimensional users too. In the past couple of years many people who have existing SSAS Multidimensional implementations have thought about migrating to SSAS Tabular so they can take advantage of its new features or move to the cloud, and indeed many of them have already migrated successfully. However, up to now, the biggest blocker for those wanting to migrate from Multidimensional to Tabular has been the fact that some complex calculations that can be expressed in MDX cannot be recreated (or recreated easily and efficiently) in DAX, because DAX has not had an equivalent of calculated members not on the Measures dimension or the MDX SCOPE statement.

Calculation groups do not remove this roadblock completely, but they do remove the roadblock for a large group of existing SSAS Multidimensional users whose only complex calculation requirement is a time utility/shell/date tool dimension. As a result these SSAS Multidimensional users will now be able to migrate to SSAS Tabular 2019, Azure Analysis Services or Power BI if they want to. Only those people who have more exotic uses for calculated members not on the Measures dimension (which are not very common at all) and those who use SCOPE statements (a larger group – many people working with financial data use SCOPE statements heavily) will find that Multidimensional is still the correct platform for them.

20 Years Of Analysis Services

Today marks the 20th birthday of Analysis Services: it was released (as OLAP Services) on November 16th 1998. There’s a celebratory blog post and video over on the Power BI blog here:

https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/analysis-services-is-20-years-old/

I’m one of the interviewees on the video, and in it I tell the story of my involvement with Analysis Services and MDX – I’ve been working with it almost full-time for a little over 20 years, right from the first betas. I’ve enjoyed every minute of it, and I’d like to take the opportunity here to thank all the people who have helped me over the years at IMS Health, Microsoft Consulting Switzerland, in the SSAS and Power BI community, and in my career as an independent consultant and trainer. If you had told me in 1998 that I would still be making a living with this product (even still writing some MDX) I’m not sure I would have believed you.

Finally, if your Bingling skills have failed you, here’s the OLAP Jokes post that is mentioned in the birthday video:

https://blog.crossjoin.co.uk/2005/08/25/olap-jokes/

It was for many years the most popular post on my blog. I should point out that I didn’t write all those jokes: my colleagues at the time, Jon Axon and Colin Hardie, deserve some of the blame too.

Azure Data Studio Should Support Analysis Services And Power BI Premium Capacities

I’m at the PASS Summit this week, and in this morning’s keynote there was a demo of the newly-released Azure Data Studio  – a modern, cross-platform tool for managing and querying SQL Server, Azure SQL Database and other Azure data services (it’s carefully described as “complementary to” SQL Server Management Studio rather than a replacement for it; this blog post has a detailed discussion of this question).

This video is provides a good, short overview of what it is:

I think it’s pretty cool, BUT… it doesn’t support Analysis Services. I had a moan about this and the generally poor state of Analysis Services tooling on Twitter, was invited to meet some of the developers and was told that if enough people request Analysis Services support it might happen.

What would support for Analysis Services involve? The following springs to mind:

  • I’d like to be able to connect to and manage Analysis Services Multidimensional and Tabular on-premises and Azure Analysis Services; if that’s too ambitious I could settle for supporting only Analysis Services Tabular 2016+ and Azure Analysis Services.
  • Since we will soon be able to connect to a Power BI Premium capacity as if it was an Analysis Services instance via XMLA endpoints, I would want to be able to connect to Power BI Premium capacity too.
  • I’d want to be able to run DAX and M queries, and ideally MDX queries too.
  • I would also want to be able to work with ASSL and TMSL for scripting and editing objects.
  • Azure Data Studio has a Profiler extension that works on xEvents; it would be great if that worked with Analysis Services xEvents too.
  • DAX and M Jupyter notebooks would be really useful!
  • It would make sense for some of the functionality of existing tools like DAX Studio and BISM Normalizer being turned into extensions.

If you want to see Analysis Services support in Azure Data Studio, go to the following issue on the Azure Data Studio GitHub repository:

https://github.com/Microsoft/azuredatastudio/issues/1026

…and click the thumbs-up icon on the first post:

AzureDataStudio

Let’s make our voices heard!

 

 

Finding All Selected Items In An Excel Slicer Connected To SSAS, Power BI Or the Excel Data Model Using Dynamic Arrays

The big news in the world of Excel right now is the introduction of dynamic arrays. They’re only available in the Office 365 click-to-run version of Excel and, at the time of writing, only available to people on the Office Insiders programme, but eventually they’ll be available to anyone running Excel for Office 365 on their desktop. There are already lots of blog posts about them including this overview by Jon Acampora, and you probably also want to download Bill Jelen’s detailed mini-book on them here which is free for the rest of 2018. Now I’m not an Excel expert by any stretch of the imagination but I’m as excited as anyone else about them because they will be incredibly useful for anyone building reports using Excel cube functions against Analysis Services, the Excel Data Model/Power Pivot and Power BI. Bill Jelen’s book has a short section on this subject but the possibilities are limitless…

Here’s one example of how they can be used. A while ago I blogged about how to use a regular array formula and the TextJoin() Excel function to get all the selected items from a slicer. Dynamic arrays make this problem much easier to solve. Take the following table loaded into the Excel Data Model:

Capture1

Now, say you have a PivotTable built from this and a slicer (called Slicer_Fruit) connected to it:

Capture2

It’s possible to use the CubeSet() function to get the set of selected items in a slicer using the following formula:

=CUBESET("ThisWorkbookDataModel",Slicer_Fruit,"Slicer Set")

Assuming this formula is in cell H1, you can then get the number of items in this set using CubeSetCount():

=CUBESETCOUNT($H$1)

Assuming this is in cell H2, all you need to do to get a comma-delimited list of all the selected items in the slicer via this set is:

=
 TEXTJOIN(
  ", ", 
  TRUE, 
  CUBERANKEDMEMBER(
   "ThisWorkbookDataModel",
   $H$1, 
   SEQUENCE($H$2,1)
  )
 )

Capture3

Here it is in action:

demo

It works as follows:

  • The new Sequence() function is used to create a dynamic array of numbers from one to the number returned by the CubeSetCount() function.
  • The CubeRankedMember() gets the name of each of the items in the set using the numbers returned by Sequence()
  • TextJoin() then concatenates all of the names returned by CubeRankedMember() into a single comma-delimited list.

You can download the sample workbook here (remember it will only work if you have a version of Excel installed that includes dynamic arrays!).

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