Detailed Article On The Power Query Formula Firewall And Data Privacy Settings

While writing my Microsoft Business Applications Summit session on Power Query-related reasons for Power BI dataset refresh failures (which you can watch online here for free, along with all the other sessions), I remembered something important that I have been meaning to blog about for a while. It’s an excellent article by Ehren von Lehe of the Power Query dev team that contains the first fully detailed explanation of how the Power Query Formula Firewall and data privacy settings actually work. Called “Behind the scenes of the Data Privacy Firewall” you can read it on the Power Query MSDN forum here:

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/ca434e2d-88fe-4962-b46a-a1db51e8bd89/feedback-wanted-behind-the-scenes-of-the-data-privacy-firewall?forum=powerquery

It’s a must-read for any Power Query fan, and it answers a number of the questions I raised in my series of blog posts on the data privacy settings here.

Paginated Report Bear And The Future Of Analysis Services Multidimensional

“Who, or what, is Paginated Report Bear?” I hear you ask. Well, he’s the breakout social media star of 2019, a furry YouTube sensation whose incisive interviews of members of the Power BI development team have become renowned for their deep technical content and insights into the Power BI roadmap. If you’re not watching his videos on YouTube, you’re missing out. Guy In A Cube is so 2018.

Paginated Report Bear

[That’s me on the left and Paginated Report Bear on the right]

Anyway, one question I am asked all the time is what the future holds for Analysis Services Multidimensional. While there is no firm news on what’s happening here, two of Paginated Report Bear’s recent interviews have discussed this topic and are particularly revealing. If you’re an SSAS MD and MDX fan I strongly recommend you watch the interviews with Josh Caplan:

…and Amir Netz:

I also had the honour to be interviewed by him at the Microsoft Business Applications Summit this week and we discussed this topic too, although I would like to stress that unlike Amir and Josh I have absolutely no influence on the decisions made in this area; in any case, my opinions on this topic might surprise some of you.

Removing HTML Tags From Text In Power Query/Power BI

Recently I found I needed to remove all the HTML tags from some text in Power Query. I searched and found a great – if complex – function from Marcel Beug here, but I realised that since that post was written the Html.Table M function has been added to the language and that it makes the task very easy. In fact it’s basically the same as the solution I blogged about here for extracting URLs from a web page.

Here’s an example of how to do it:

let
    Source = 
        "<!DOCTYPE html>
        <html>
        <body>
        <h1>A Heading</h1>
        <p>A paragraph</p>
        </body>
        </html>",
    RemoveTags = Html.Table(Source, {{"text",":root"}}),
    GetText = RemoveTags[text]{0}
in
    GetText

Here’s the output of this query:

image

The important part is the call to Html.Table using the “:root” CSS selector:

Html.Table(Source, {{"text",":root"}})

This returns a table with one column and one row, containing the text; the GetText step in the query above just gets the contents of the only cell in that table.

I’m Joining Microsoft

I have an announcement: tomorrow (Monday June 3rd) I’m starting a new job on the Power BI CAT team at Microsoft. It won’t affect what happens here on my blog, but I wanted to write this post because so many people have asked me why I’m making this move.

First and foremost the job at Microsoft offers some exciting new challenges for me that I wouldn’t get as a self-employed person. I’ll get to work on some of the biggest, most complex Power BI implementations in the world, provide feedback to the Power BI development team, and still be able to speak at conferences and do many of the other things I love doing now. I’ll also have the pleasure of working with a truly stellar bunch of colleagues who I know I’ll learn a lot from. And of course, what better product to work on than Power BI and what better tech company to work for nowadays than Microsoft? Power BI is going from strength to strength and I want to make a direct contribution to its future success.

What’s more the offer from Microsoft came at a time when I was getting a bit bored with the work I’ve been doing. If you do any job for long enough it gets repetitive and in my case after thirteen years (over a quarter of my life!) of running my own company I felt like I needed a change. Also, as I have made the shift from being a SSAS/MDX guy to being a Power BI guy I’ve been doing less and less technical consultancy and more and more training, mostly in the form of introductory Power BI courses. I enjoy training, I’d like to think I’m fairly good at it and it has proved very lucrative indeed – I just don’t want to be a full-time trainer, teaching the same material week after week.

Training and consultancy also involve a lot of travel. Over the last few years I’ve averaged more than ten nights per month in hotels and on top of that there were many nights when I got home late after a long journey back from a customer site. My wife has been very supportive and it’s all my kids have ever known, but it’s tiring and I want to spend more time with my family before my kids grow up and leave home. I’ve been to some interesting places on business I would never have been to otherwise and worked with some great companies, so yes, I have enjoyed myself. Business travel is nowhere near as glamorous or thrilling as it may seem, though, and I’m happy that I’ll be doing less of it. There’s also the risk that Brexit (if and when and how it ever happens) will stop me from working in Europe as easily as I have done in the past, so travelling as much might not even have been an option going forward.

Being self-employed has been a great experience and it’s something I would recommend to anyone who is thinking of doing it. I’m immensely grateful to all my customers, business partners and fellow members of the SQL and Power BI communities for making Crossjoin Consulting so successful. However it’s time for me to move on and try something new. Wish me luck! I’ll be back to blogging about Power BI, Power Query, SSAS, DAX and M next week.

%d bloggers like this: