Testing Power BI Premium Features With Power BI Embedded

It is very difficult for an organisation to decide whether to buy Power BI Premium or to stick with Power BI Pro. Power BI Premium represents a big financial commitment, but how do you know whether the benefits will be worth the costs involved? This was a question that Melissa Coates and I dealt with in great detail in the second version of our white paper “Planning A Power BI Enterprise Deployment”, and I strongly suggest you read the relevant section (pages 37-42) if you are considering buying Premium.

However, it’s one thing to read a white paper and another to actually test Premium yourself – and right now there is no way of trying Premium before you buy it. As more and more features like SSRS paginated reports or linked entities in dataflows get added to Premium, the more likely it is you are going to want to test these features before buying Premium. So what do you do? The answer is to use Power BI Embedded instead. It’s not exactly the same thing as Premium (the setup experience is different, for one thing), but there are three significant facts to point out:

  • I have been assured by several senior Microsoft employees that all new Premium features will be available in both the Premium (EM and P) SKUs and the Embedded (A) SKUs. So, for example, when the SSRS paginated report feature is released it will be available in both Premium and Embedded.
  • The resources available (in terms of the number of v-cores and memory) in the various Premium SKUs mirror those available in the Embedded SKUs. For example a P1 Premium SKU has the same resources available as an A4 Embedded SKU.
  • With Power BI Embedded, unlike Power BI Premium, you only need to pay for what you use: you can pause a Power BI Embedded capacity when you are not using it and pay nothing.

Therefore, to sum up, if you want to test Premium features before you buy, all you need to do is create a new Power BI Embedded capacity in the Azure portal and assign a Workspace to it – and you’ll get access to all the Premium features. When you’ve finished just pause the capacity. You’ll still need to pay while you’re testing but it will be a fraction of the cost of buying Premium.

Can You Use Power Query In Power BI Or Excel To Write Data To A Data Source?

The short answer: no.

The long answer:

It is, technically, possible to use Power Query (in either Power BI or Excel) to write data to a data source; for example, here’s an old post I wrote showing how to run a UPDATE statement to update data in a table in SQL Server. However because the Power Query engine may evaluate a value or statement more than once when a query is executed, it is therefore not safe or supported to use it to try to create, insert, update, delete or otherwise change data in a data source – it should only be used to read data. You may see some functions listed in the M function reference that suggest otherwise but they aren’t supported either, and indeed may not work at all.

Thanks to Matt Masson of the dev team for providing the official position on this.

A Function To Generate The M Code For A Table Type

This is going to sound obscure, and it is, but recently I’ve been using the #table() intrinsic function in M a lot – specifically the version that takes a table type as its first parameter (as I describe here) – and because it’s a bit of a pain to have to write the M code for a table type by hand, I’ve written an M function that takes a table and returns the text for the M code that is needed to define a table type. Here it is:

(InputTable as table) as text =>
let
    Source = 
        Table.Schema(InputTable),
    SortRows = 
        Table.Sort(
            Source,
            {{"Position", Order.Ascending}}),
    RemoveColumns = 
        Table.SelectColumns(
            SortRows,
            {"Name", "TypeName"}),
    AddCustom = 
        Table.AddColumn(
            RemoveColumns, 
            "TypeNames", 
            each 
            Expression.Identifier([Name]) & " = " & [TypeName]),
    Output = 
        "[" & Text.Combine(AddCustom[TypeNames], ", ") & "]"
in
    Output

Nothing complex here, but now I’ve posted this I know that in the future I’ll be able to Google for it when I’m working onsite with a customer and I need it!

To give you an idea of how it works, take the table that is returned by the following M expression, which calls the public TripPin OData web service:

OData.Feed(
"https://services.odata.org/TripPinRESTierService/Airports", 
null, 
[Implementation="2.0"])

image

Passing this table to the function above returns the following text, the M code for a record that lists the names of the columns in this table and their data types, suitable for use with #table:

[Name = Text.Type, IcaoCode = Text.Type, 
IataCode = Text.Type, Location = Record.Type]
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